Book Archives

Talk | Abu Dhabi International Book Fair

Megumi Matsubara is a guest speaker at Abu Dhabi International Book Fair 2016 for Al Multaqa Literary Salon. In this presentation, she will unfold multiple layers of her project “A proposal for a textbook to learn Braille, English, and other languages” (2012-2015, and beyond), including its states of pottery workshop, bronze sculptures, Graphic Braille, Acoustic Braille.

Abu Dhabi International Book Fair
27 April – 3 May, 2016
9:00 am – 10:00 pm

Talk by Megumi Matsubara:
“Seeing Through Eyes”
30 April 2016
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Al Multaqa Literary Salon
“We Read”…
It is an invitation to enhance our lives by reading; “We Read”… because each book has its own life; It is a medium which constantly amazes us, and offers different points of view to life. “We Read”… to intensify a whole collection of lives in our lives to make it more diverse, more integral; This is the 26th Edition of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair, which is Al Multaqa eighth year of participation in the fair. During these eight years we have hosted numerous authors, artists and other quests in the literary world. Our motto has always been to nourish the culture of our nation in its efforts for future advancement.

Reading & Talk | Alley Cat Books | San Francisco

Un Coquelicot: reading & talk by Megumi Matsubara

Megumi Matsubara reads from her book The Tale of the Japanese and the Mosquito, followed by a talk about her perennial subject: red poppy. The space will be scented with the fragrance of the red poppy field that a prominent Moroccan botanist/aromatherapist produced with Matsubara’s tale as inspiration. 

Megumi Matsubara is a Japanese artist who lives and works between Morocco and Japan. She is a guest artist in the city of San Francisco as part of the exhibition ‘SLOW DIALOGUES: Time, Space, and Scale’ guest curated by Slow Research Lab. Her site-specific installation It Is a Garden (2016) is on view at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts from April 22 – July 10, 2016.

Time: 2PM – 3PM
Place: Alley Cat Books and Gallery
Contact: +1 (415) 824-1761

*About the exhibition:
‘SLOW DIALOGUES: Time, Space, and Scale’
Upstairs Galleries at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA)
Guest curated by Slow Research Lab

Alley Cat Books

 

 

The Tale of the Japanese and the Garden at Festival des musiques sacrées

JnanSbil_MegumiMatsubara2014S

Rencontre avec MEGUMI MATSUBARA et YUKO HASEGAWA
à la 20ème édition du Festival des musiques sacrées de Fès

.
The Tale of the Japanese and the Garden

/ Performance by Megumi Matsubara & Lecture by Yuko Hasegawa at Jnan Sbil Garden

Japanese artist Megumi Matsubara will give a reading of her upcoming book The Tale of the Japanese and the Garden: second volume to be published from a series of 8 stories written by the artist. The first volume The Tale of the Japanese and the Mosquito was published in March 2014. Following the performance, leading Japanese curator and art critic Yuko Hasegawa (chief curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo) will talk about Art and Public Space especially in the field of sound art that bridges local music traditions with contemporary practices, introducing examples from the 11th Sharjah Biennale in UAE in 2013 where she served as a curator. The event will include a conversation exchange with all.

 

LIBRAIRIE DES COLONNES, RENCONTRE AVEC L’ARTISTE MEGUMI MATSUBARA

 

Exhibition – Book signing – Reading with music by Megumi Matsubara (language: Japanese/English) at Librairie des Colonnes bookstore

Exposition – Signature – Lecture poétique sonorisée par Megumi Matsubara (langue: japonais/anglais) à Librairie des Colonnes

.

Megumi Matsubara reads her work The Tale of the Japanese and the Mosquito. The reading will be followed by a presentation of her other titles including A proposal for a textbook to learn Braille, English, and other languages. She will introduce the details and structures behind those titles, exhibiting her related works in the store of Librairie des Colonnes.

Hosted by: Simon-Pierre Hamelin (director, Librairie des Colonnes)

TheBlindDream_ReadingPerformanceS

 

 

Book: My Imaginary Lagos


This book contains Matsubara’s photographic work 《My Imaginary Lagos》 and text 《Anchor, Shoes, and Sleep》. Limited to 500 copies, printed in Tangier, Morocco in June 2012. Hand-numbered on the last page.

“Presence/absence” is a recurring discourse in Matsubara’s work. What tells you with certainty that something really exists? Does the act of documentation make it so? Matsubara’s “My Imaginary Lagos” raised these questions. Her photographic oeuvre, made before visiting the city, juxtaposed images of Lagos taken by an acquaintance with Matsubara’s own images of other places. Was this not in fact Lagos as an ‘Invisible City?’ Beyond presenting the uncertainty of documentation, she had revealed the presence of her ‘imagined’ Lagos.

– excerpt from Satoko Shibahara’s essay “The Stranger in Marrakech”

Available for purchase at:
– La Maison de La Photographie, Marrakech (Morocco)
– On Sundays, Watarium Museum, Tokyo (Japan)
– Nanyodo Architecture Bookstore, Tokyo (Japan)

*An appendix booklet is included in the copies sold in Japan containing 《Ikari, Kutsu, soshite Nemuri》; the original Japanese version of 《Anchor, Shoes, and Sleep》.



 

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES

 

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES / DREAMERS DREAM DREAMS

– Did you dream last night?

This is the question that I asked the seven Moroccan children who are blind.
With this question, I was once rejected. With the same question, another time I was given a key to enter their secretive worlds.

They are studying English and computers. I joined their classes to know them. While talking, our eyes never meet. We constantly touch each other to confirm our mutual presence.

In one of the first English classes in my childhood, there was a phrase in a text book, “I touch you. You touch me.” Kids were laughing when they read this text. We don’t have a culture of casually touching each other’s body in Japan. This sounded like a useless phrase to us. But then what is it that tells you something is physically in front of you? While talking to them, I never move my eyes away from their faces. But my eyes begin to see through their physical presence. What am I seeing beyond things that are in front of my eyes?

In Marrakech, there is a belief transmitted over generations that seven guardians have been protecting the city. In both Islam and Christianity, there is a story of seven sleepers who have fallen asleep in a cave for more than 300 years. When they woke, they started telling their dreams. Their stories were treated as predicting the future; here is the ironic paradox of nostalgia for hidden memories.

Dreams only exist in your memory. Therefore, their possession is only limited to yourself. But once you start telling your dreams to others, through this act of storytelling, they begin to exist in someone else’s memory.

I know someone else’s dream because I asked for it.

“I never saw colours in my life,” one of the children told me. She explained the colours of the house she built in her dream. I asked, “How could you tell the colours of the house?”. She answered, “Because it was me who asked people to paint it in those colours.”

“My dream is my hope,” one of the children told me. She never saw anything with her eyes. She smiled and said, “I didn’t dream in the night but my dreams are my wishes.”

Where does this will to dream come from?

A boy told me, “I will be crazy if I remember all my dreams!” He said, “I usually get scared when I dream.”

With the first girl I talked to, I was very nervous. She could see a tiny bit and was wearing sunglasses. I could see her big beautiful eyes through the dark glasses. I had a recorder and a camera with me so I told her I had them in front of her. She said it was no problem. I documented our conversation. Later, when we met again, she said her dream became a secret. She told me the reason and I promised to seal her dream forever in my own memory.

She asked me, “Why do you ask about blind people’s dreams? What do you feel when they tell you?” I couldn’t answer this question immediately. I was curious to know how we would try to communicate in a territory where neither of us has visual control. I kept visiting, observing, exchanging conversations, waiting for the moment when suddenly things begin to unfold.

But the more I got to know their dreams, the more I realised the cruelty of my question. Sometimes they went deep down into their memory to tell me something, while at other times they tried to imagine their own dreams. The world I received an invitation to was a special terrain. In the world of dreams shared between us, there was no line I could draw between their sight and my sight, or their dreams and what I imagined from their stories.

To answer the question, I had to imagine their dreams like they imagine what I see. My dreams will begin to weave a pattern interconnected with their dreams. It is a territory where memory and future meet.

And here is what I feel: Rêveurs Rêve Rêves, as an architectural intervention to La Maison de La Photographie de Marrakech.

 

MEGUMI MATSUBARA

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES is a Japanese artist Megumi Matsubara’s self-organised exhibition; seven-day intervention to La Maison de La Photographie, Marrakech. The project is warmly supported by organizations and individuals stated below and produced with the support of La Fondation Dar Al-Ma’mûn.

The exhibition consists of a series of architectural interventions, a proposal for a textbook to learn braille and other languages, an artist book, limited to 500 copies & numbered and 7 kinds of original postcards of morocco 2012 photographed by the artist.

Program:
– 15 June: Pottery workshop with the blind children, Berber Museum of Ourika
– 24 June: Vernissage, afternoon 13h00-16h00
– 28 June: Artist talk, book presentation 14h00-15h00
– 30 June: Closing, afternoon

With the support of:
Dar Al-Ma’mûn, IDMAJ (Cooperation for the integration of the visually impaired and handicapped, Marrakech), Université Cadi Ayyad, Berber Museum of Ourika, La Maison de La Photographie, American Language Center Marrakech

Special thanks to:
Salah Lahouircha, Khaoula Berry, Fatima Almzar, Khaoula Bahaqui, Safaa Ahroui, Sara Rostani, Meryem Boutmert, Brahim Tigharmin, Hamid Aitouznag, Aicha Jinoui, Younesse Oumghari, Abdelaziz Ait Mansour, Prof. Mohammed Bougroum, Hannah Barnes, Michelle Hank, Samya Abid, Ayoub Mouzaine, Béatrice De Bock, Omar Berrada, Yto Barrada, Carleen Hamon, Julien Amicel, Rheda Moali, Houria Afoufou, Kenneth Brown, Elena Prentice, Abdelaziz Zerrou, Michael Thorsby, Cameron Allan McKean, Hamid Mergani, Khalid Ben Yussef, Said Aozou, Mahjoub Ilzi, Mouhsine Beddad, Mohamed Assad, Patrick Manac’h

Press and communication:
Carleen Hamon / Dar Al-Maʼmûn:
<carleen.hamon@dam-arts.org> +212 (0)6 19 69 95 78
Said Aozou / La Maison de La Photographie:
<maisondelaphotographie@gmail.com> +212 (0)5 24 38 57 21

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES

 

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES

– Avez-vous rêvé la nuit dernière ?

Telle est la question que j’ai posée à sept enfants marocains non-voyants.
Dans un premier temps, ils m’ont rejeté. En reposant la même question, une autre fois, j’avais reçu la clé pour entrer dans leurs mondes secrets.

Ils étudient l’anglais et l’informatique. Je les ai rejoins dans les classes pour les connaitre. Tandis qu’on se parlait, nos yeux ne se sont jamais rencontrés. Nous nous sommes constamment touchés pour confirmer notre présence mutuelle.

Pendant mes premières années a l’école, on avait une phrase dans un livre scolaire en Anglais: « je te touche, tu me touches. » Les enfants riaient aux éclats quand ils lisaient ce texte. Au Japon, on n’a pas cette culture de se toucher le corps les uns les autres. cette phrase n’avait aucune importance pour nous, aucune utilite.
Mais alors qu’est-ce qui vous dit quelque chose est physiquement en face de vous? Tout en parlant à eux, je n’ai jamais déplacé mes yeux de leurs visages. Mais mes yeux commencent à voir à travers leur présence physique. Qu’est-ce que je vois au-delà des choses qui sont en face de mes yeux?

A Marrakech, il ya une croyance transmise de génération en génération que sept gardiens ont été protégeant la ville. Dans les deux cas, l’islam et le christianisme, il ya une histoire de sept dormants d’Éphèse qui se sont endormis dans une caverne pour plus de 300 ans. Lorsqu’ils se réveillèrent, ils ont commencé à raconter leurs rêves. Leurs histoires ont été traitées comme une prédiction de l’avenir, voici le paradoxe ironique de la nostalgie des souvenirs cachés.

Les rêves n’existent que dans la mémoire. Ainsi, ils n’appartiennent qu’à vous-mêmes. Mais, lorsque nous commençons à les partager, par le biais de l’histoire ou du conte, ils commencent à prendre forme dans la mémoire des autres.

Je connais le rêve de quelqu’un parce que je le lui ai demandé.

« Je n’ai, de ma vie, jamais entrevu les couleurs », me dit une enfant non-voyante.  Elle m’expliqua cependant les couleurs de la maison qu’elle construisait dans ses rêves.  Je lui demandai  « Comment peux-tu parler de ses couleurs ? » Elle répondit, « Parce que ce fut moi qui demandait aux gens de la peindre avec ces couleurs. »

« Mes rêves sont mes espoirs », me dit l’un des enfants. Elle n’avait pu jamais au travers ses yeux. Elle sourit et dit: « Je n’ai pas rêvé la nuit parce que mes rêves sont mes vœux. »

D’où vient cette volonté de rêver ?

Un garçon me dit « Je serai fou si je me rappelais de tous mes rêves ! », et il rajouta: « Normalement, j’ai peur quand je rêve. »

Avec la première fille à qui j’ai parlé, je fus très nerveuse. Elle pouvait voir un tout petit peu, et portait des lunettes de soleil. Je pouvais distinguer ses grands beaux yeux au travers de ses sombres lunettes.  J’avais emporté un enregistreur et une caméra avec moi, et l’avait prévenu que de la présence de ce matériel à ses côtés. Elle me dit que cela ne la dérangeait pas. J’enregistrais notre conversation. Plus tard, lorsque nous nous rencontrâmes encore, elle me dit que son rêve était devenu un secret. Elle m’en dit la raison et je lui promis de le sceller à jamais dans ma mémoire.

Elle m’a questionné: « Pourquoi demandez-vous concernant les rêves des personnes non-voyants? Que pensez-vous quand ils vous disent? » Je ne pouvais pas répondre immédiatement à cette question. J’étais curieuse de savoir comment nous allions essayer de communiquer dans un territoire où aucun d’entre nous n’a un contrôle visuel. J’ai gardé la visite, en observant, en échangeant des conversations, en attendant le moment où, soudain, les choses commencent à se déployer.

Mais plus j’ai appris à connaître leurs rêves, plus je réalisais la cruauté de ma question. Parfois, ils sont allés en profondeur de leur mémoire me dire quelque chose, tandis que d’autres fois, ils ont essayé d’imaginer leurs propres rêves. Le monde auquel j’ai été invitée était un espace spécial. Dans le monde des rêves partagés entre nous, il n’y avait pas de ligne que je pouvais dessiner entre leurs regards et le mien, mais seulement leurs rêves et ce que j’ai imaginé à partir de leurs histoires.

Pour répondre à la question, je devais me projeter dans les rêves de ces enfants comme si j’imaginais ce que je voyais moi-même. Mes rêves ont commencé à avoir une impression interconnectée avec les leurs. C’est un territoire où mémoire et futur se croisent.

Ce que je ressens est le suivant: Rêveurs Rêve Rêves, comme une intervention architecturale pour la Maison de La Photographie de Marrakech.

 

MEGUMI MATSUBARA

RÊVEURS RÊVE RÊVES est le travail de Megumi Matsubara, artiste japonaise, qui organise cette exposition: sept jours d’interventions à la Maison de la Photographie de Marrakech. Le projet est fortement appuyé par les organisations et les particuliers énoncés ci-dessous. Le travail a été produit avec le soutien de La Fondation Dar Al-Ma’mûn.

L’exposition se compose d’une série de interventions architecturales, une proposition d’étudier Braille et autres langues a travers un livre, une présentation d’un livre d’artiste, limitée à 500 copies et numérotées et 7 types de cartes postales originales du Maroc 2012 photographiée par l’artiste.

Programme:
– 15 Juin: Atelier de potterie avec des enfants aveugles, Berber Museum of Ourika
– 24 Juin: Vernissage, après-midi 13h00-16h00
– 28 Juin: Mot d’un artiste, présentation du livre 14h00-15h00
– 30 Juin: Fermeture

Avec le soutien de:
Dar Al-Ma’mûn, IDMAJ (Cooperation for the integration of the visually impaired and handicapped, Marrakech), Université Cadi Ayyad, Berber Museum of Ourika, La Maison de La Photographie, American Language Center Marrakech

Mes sinceres remerciement pour:
Salah Lahouircha, Khaoula Berry, Fatima Almzar, Khaoula Bahaqui, Safaa Ahroui, Sara Rostani, Meryem Boutmert, Brahim Tigharmin, Hamid Aitouznag, Aicha Jinoui, Younesse Oumghari, Abdelaziz Ait Mansour, Prof. Mohammed Bougroum, Hannah Barnes, Michelle Hank, Samya Abid, Ayoub Mouzaine, Béatrice De Bock, Omar Berrada, Yto Barrada, Carleen Hamon, Julien Amicel, Redha Moali, Houria Afoufou, Kenneth Brown, Elena Prentice, Abdelaziz Zerrou, Michael Thorsby, Cameron Allan McKean, Hamid Mergani, Khalid Ben Yussef, Said Aozou, Mahjoub Ilzi, Mouhsine Beddad, Mohamed Assad, Patrick Manac’h

Contact presse:
Carleen Hamon / Dar Al-Maʼmûn:
<carleen.hamon@dam-arts.org> +212 (0)6 19 69 95 78
Said Aozou / La Maison de La Photographie:
<maisondelaphotographie@gmail.com> +212 (0)5 24 38 57 21

11 Methods of ’00s

Book including Assistants (Megumi Matsubara & Hiroi Ariyama) co-authored texts exploring the concept of creating Space through our practice over the years.

The book was published in Japan on 31st Jan 2012 from Rikuyosha.


For purchase> 
amazon